2009 PR Predictions

By Melissa Hourigan
Partner,
Digital Idea Media

1. More and more journalists will take a liking to the idea of a pitch in 140 characters or less regardless if they are on Twitter.

2. Budget practices will have to be redone as more social media tactics are introduced to the PR program.

3. Smaller agencies will win the mindshare in social media due to the time it takes to understand communities and the tools available.

4. Phrases like “above the fold” and “embargo” will be used less and less.

5. PR firms that practice “PR as usual” and don’t diversify their offerings will see a dip in retainers.

6. Audio and video will become more important with each PR campaign.

7. Vendor accounts will be created for sharing sites such as FlickR, SlideShare.net, YouTube, iTunes, TubeMogule.

8. Viral and word-of-mouth marketing will be one of the top areas of interest, primarily for consumer brands.

9. Blogging as we know it will evolve as more microblogging tools and concepts are unveiled.

10. PR measurement will have to evolve (thankfully) and include web-based analytics vs. advertising equivalents.

2009 PR Predictions

By Pete Webb
Principal,
Webb PR

Following the mid-spring demise of the Rocky Mountain News, we’ll be deluged with resumes from former Rocky staffers.  PR hiring remains flat, so many of those journalists won’t be able to land.  The Post will pick up a handful, but it won’t improve the product or local news gathering, and it won’t go back to a robust stand-alone business section.

“New media” will remain a mystery to anyone over 40.  In targeted campaigns we’ll be able to achieve some penetration and results through  blogging/Twitter/YouTube strategies, but like so many PR strategies, the approach is situational and will have to be rifle-shot.

Channel 4 will release news anchor Karen Leigh and try again for a counter-voice to Jim Benneman.  Leigh may have the looks, but not the presence.  KCNC is better off letting Benneman go solo.

Steve Kelley will end up back on KOA.

Corporate PR spending in Colorado will remain steady but restrained, and start to show signs of a rebound in third quarter 2009.

Governor Ritter will continue to cross swords with the oil and gas industry, and no one will come forward to forge a compromise.

And the Rockies will continue to be a disappointment.