Weber Shandwick’s Hugh Williams Transitions to CMO Role

HughWilliamsHugh Williams, the longtime head of the Denver office of global public relations firm Weber Shandwick, has taken the position of CMO at injury prevention and recovery technology company Addaday. Williams built Weber Shandwick’s endurance sports practice and led the strategy, development and execution of award-winning integrated sports marketing campaigns. He will be based in Boulder.

Williams will be joined by Kristin Goett, who was named Addaday’s Communications Director. She brings five years of in-house communications experience across brands including DISH Network and the University of Denver. She also has been a columnist for Triathlete Magazine.

‘Content Fusion’ Just Marketing Hype

When I was a vice president at Weber Shandwick, I spent a lot of my time – 60 percent, if you believed my job description – having conversations with prospective clients, and I was always looking for a hook that would let me have a different kind of conversation with them than my competitors could have.

So I was curious about the agency’s announcement last week of its new “content fusion” approach to integrated storytelling that promises to identify “what stories can be told in which formats and where to drive those stories.”

After watching the video and reading the white paper, it is clear that “content fusion” is both brilliant and disappointing. It is brilliant because it give Weber Shandwick another proprietary hook to have unique conversations with a prospective client, and disappointing because it boils down to simply acknowledging that some stories are better told using video and graphics. Hardly innovative stuff, but you have to give Weber Shandwick credit for the fancy packaging.

Weber Shandwick Study Finds CEOs ‘Unsocial’

Weber Shandwick has released a new report that examines the roles CEOs play in social media, and the news is mixed:

Our analysis revealed results that were good and not-so-good. Robust signs exist that CEOs are actively taking charge of their corporate reputations and demonstrating leadership through communications. For the most part, they are extensively quoted in the business press, frequently deliver keynote speeches at conferences, and participate in business school forums. But when it comes to digital engagement and social media, CEOs are generally “unsocial.” As more CEOs take on the mantle of “chief narrator,” however, we expect that this will change and change fast.