Denver PR Blog


GroundFloor Media Banned
May 9, 2008, 7:20 pm
Filed under: GroundFloor Media, Pitches

Congratulations to GroundFloor Media, which was the only Denver-based agency to make the cut in Lifehacker editor Gina Trapani’s PR Spammers Wiki, a cut and paste Gmail filter that will instantly block hundreds of PR addresses based on their domain name. Trapani is following in the footsteps of Wired’s Chris Anderson in publicly outing those they believe to be spamming. As card-carrying flacks, however, we know what a bunch of complaining know-it-alls reporters can be, so we applaud GroundFloor Media for pushing pitching to the limits on behalf of its clients.

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3 Comments so far
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Are you suggesting that distributing irrelevant pitches is somehow a good use of client’s time and money?

Comment by Jim

No, I was being sarcastic. But truth be told I do sympathize with GroundFloor Media. Laura Love runs a very good shop, and I know she wouldn’t let staff indiscriminately spam reporters. And there are plenty of reporters who don’t see the difference between a pitch they aren’t interested in (though appropriate for them) and spam.

But I also sympathize with the reporters who do get spammed (random pitches that aren’t part of their beat and aren’t personalized). The problem is that we are letting the 10 percent of the most unreasonable journalists and the worst 10 percent of PR people define the debate.

Aarti Shah at PR Week has a great article on this topic this week: http://www.prweekus.com/PR-blacklist-wont-fix-imperfect-system/article/110084/.

Comment by denverprblog

I thought I detected a touch of sarcasm in the post! However, I tend to feel that the problem is larger than just 10 percent of either journalists or PR practitioners. Often, irrelevant pitches can be driven by clients who insist on knowing that their “news” was delivered to X number of reporters at X number of pubs, blogs, ezines, etc. It’s the PR professionals job to winnow these numbers down to ensure we are not scarring the reputation of the client or ourselves.

I’m not sure we always do a crackerjack job of this.

Comment by Jim




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